Grateful for the Rain

Although I have a few less members for my first season than I had hoped and needed in order to hire help, I am enjoying the fact that I can actually skip using the tractor for a lot of the planting and just crawl along the rows on my hands and knees and plant my kale, broccoli, onions, cabbage, squash, beans, celery…(the list goes on…) by hand. Yes it takes much longer, and is much more taxing than with two people riding on the transplanter. But it is also enjoyably quiet and peaceful.

Today we rushed and with Kate driving the tractor and myself on the transplanter, we got in several rows of potatoes and sweet corn before lunch, and then, just in time before the storm hit, got the summer sqash in the ground. The first raindrops fell as we put the tractor in the shed and the tools tucked away. And then it poured. Thank heavens. Because the poor fresh transplants that went in the ground over the past two days looked pretty pathetic sticking out of the hot, dry soil.

With a lot more rain expected the next couple of days, I am quite grateful for the break from kneeling on the dry hard soil, shopping, relaxing and regrouping, and turning my focus to the hoophouses. 

Water

I remember years ago, I was living in Los Angeles at the time, wondering why we had to pay for water and why it cost so much. And reading reports about how dirty our tap water actually is… Bacteria, fecal particles, skin and other bio matter and all kinds of icky stuff that was found in the water we so readily drink straight from the tap. And that is served to us in restaurants, hotels and eateries everywhere.

Considering the source of our water in LA, as in most other metro areas, are reservoirs of used water, recycled over and over… Water that ran through sinks and bath tubs and car washes and toilets, ran down sewers and eaves and dirty sidewalks … Recycled and returned to us.

Oh the money we spend on water filters and bottled mountain spring water to reassure us that we drink clean, healthy water. Sucking on our water bottles 24/7 believing that we need to replenish our bodies continuously… While in reality we are feeding our bodies the very dirt, germs and bacteria we so desperately try to protect ourselves from with all the soaps and foams and sprays we can find.

Out here in the country, things are simpler for sure. First of all, getting dirty is a promise, and nobody bothers with antibacterial soaps. We embrace nature and our bodies naturally adjust, as they are designed to. Our water comes straight from an underground vein through a sand point well. Off and on we stop at a natural spring in the woods to fill up water bottles for drinking. The water there is so clean and fresh, and now with temperatures below zero, ice cold, even the best commercial copy writer could not capture the taste in words.

And best of all: it’s free. Cheers!