Beautiful Food

There is nothing as gratifying as a bowl of beautiful food. A work of art created in collaboration with mother nature.

Running my CSA by myself, without hired help, has its challenges and rewards alike. Some tasks seem daunting, like planting countless flats of seedlings by hand, trellising 250 tomato plants in a hot hoophouse, or pulling weeds out of rows and rows of lettuce, spinach, carrots and so on.

But the rewards are plenty. There is the quietude and serenity of my communion with nature. No noisy tractors or machinery to disturb the harmony of birds singing along with the breeze playing in the trees and grasses all around me.

And of course there is the deliciousness of picking the fresh, plump squash, huge buttery lettuces, colorful duck egg sized radishes and bunches of lush and crunchy baby spinach… Handsful of green and purple beans, clusters of ripe and juicy tomatoes, aromatic bulbs of fennel… Beautiful food. Fresh, organic, home grown, bursting with flavor and love…

I am proud to say: “Yes, I grow this!”

Everything grows with love

I know it has been a while and I am sure my members are all eagerly anticipating their goodie bags.

I have been busy tilling and transplanting and weeding and deer proofing (who knew deer went into hoophouses to munch on lettuce,) and irrigating… and more planting and transplanting and mowing and tilling.. 😉 And with the recent stretch of hot and sunny weather things are finally taking off and growing wonderfully.

I am planning my first delivery for the 15th. There will be boc choi, lettuce, rhubarb and herb pots (basil, chives, rosemary, cilantro, parsley)… And possibly garlic scapes if they keep growing as they have been.

I am excited to be starting deliveries, knowing folks get to enjoy the fresh and yummy goods I so enjoy growing!

Here’s to summer!

Weather aside…

There is spring in the air and great progress in the greenhouse! As in nature, where the first wild flowers are adding spots of color to the greener and greener surroundings. To my delight I spotted a large patch of violets happily abloom along the driveway! And in the greenhouse, another batch of seeds I feared lost is finally poking its needlepoint-tiny buds through the soil.

Despite early hiccups with that batch of bad soil that fried my first big set of seeds and set me back about three weeks, things are now growing nicely and rapidly and we are moving right along. Luckily there is a wonderful community of farmers working together and trading seeds, seedlings, and advice is the name of the game.

The first phase of deer fence is up around the garden, next comes the netting to keep those smarty-nosed dears from just walking right through the lines… But I will leave that tedious task for a dry and more pleasant day.

A new bigger hoophouse is going up, replacing the small “pepper shack”… This one is literally twice the size and with double siding offers opportunity for an extended season… Aaaah the possibilities.

I love this place…

Barn Cats

Rural areas have plenty of them. In fact, many farms have large colonies of 30 or 40 or more… Barn cats. Feral cats, mostly. Some fairly friendly and curious.

Every farm I have visited is feeding their cats and cares about them greatly. But because it is costly, farmers just cannot keep up with their vaccinations or, most importantly, getting them all spayed and neutered. 

Sadly, any healthy and happy barn cat population can be decimated in a blink of an eye by only one visit of a passing stray tom that brings in diseases such as feline rhinotracheitis (upper respiratory or pulminary infection), FIV, or feline leukemia which are easily spread by sharing water and food sources. Once infected, treatment, if at all possible, is costly and difficult. The only way to eliminate the virus from the farm is to put down every last cat.

Recently a neighbor’s barn cats have started sneezing and getting runny eyes. A sure sign of rhinotracheitis, caused by the feline herpes virus. I am trying to help catch the sickest so they can get antibiotic shots, and giving L-Lysine in treats and liquid form to build their immune systems and recover.

I am also researching possible forms of antibiotics or other treatments that can be administered in food to reach all the kitties.

Having been involved in animal rescue for a good 20 years in Los Angeles, I feel quite strongly about caring for all animals, even those who are not snuggly and friendly, or in farmer’s terms, useful. They do rely on us.

Together with a friend, and hopefully the support of our local vets, I am working on creating a program to fund and host annual spay/neuter and vaccine clinics, and to make medications and treatment for sick barn cats available and affordable.

Wish us luck, I will keep you all posted on our progress. If you have ideas, connections, or time and energy to help us with this project, please contact me! All support is appreciated.

Purrs!

Water

I remember years ago, I was living in Los Angeles at the time, wondering why we had to pay for water and why it cost so much. And reading reports about how dirty our tap water actually is… Bacteria, fecal particles, skin and other bio matter and all kinds of icky stuff that was found in the water we so readily drink straight from the tap. And that is served to us in restaurants, hotels and eateries everywhere.

Considering the source of our water in LA, as in most other metro areas, are reservoirs of used water, recycled over and over… Water that ran through sinks and bath tubs and car washes and toilets, ran down sewers and eaves and dirty sidewalks … Recycled and returned to us.

Oh the money we spend on water filters and bottled mountain spring water to reassure us that we drink clean, healthy water. Sucking on our water bottles 24/7 believing that we need to replenish our bodies continuously… While in reality we are feeding our bodies the very dirt, germs and bacteria we so desperately try to protect ourselves from with all the soaps and foams and sprays we can find.

Out here in the country, things are simpler for sure. First of all, getting dirty is a promise, and nobody bothers with antibacterial soaps. We embrace nature and our bodies naturally adjust, as they are designed to. Our water comes straight from an underground vein through a sand point well. Off and on we stop at a natural spring in the woods to fill up water bottles for drinking. The water there is so clean and fresh, and now with temperatures below zero, ice cold, even the best commercial copy writer could not capture the taste in words.

And best of all: it’s free. Cheers!

Felicity Farm

Welcome to Felicity Farm, a peaceful parcel of land set in beautiful rural northwestern Wisconsin.

As a brand new CSA we open our doors and growing operations in Spring 2017 to head off our first season. Member registrations are now open and we welcome all new members.We still have a good number of openings. If you are interested in joining or would like to refer a new member, please email us at angelspawswellness@yahoo.com.

As our name Felicity Farm suggests, we truly find the utmost joy, happiness, fulfilment, and pleasure in growing healthy, beautiful organic foods, and in our connection with the land. Each morning we rise to the rooster’s call and after a good cup of coffee, head out into the fields.