Eagle Update

​We just got word from the Raptor Center that the eagle is suffering from high lead toxicity and some eye trauma, and is now undergoing treatment.

Apparently, one of the main reasons for raptors entering the raptor center’s programs is lead poisoning, starting with hunting season each fall. 

The ammunition used by hunters are lead pellets. Eagles ingest them when feasting on the remains of turkeys or deer left behind by hunters.

Unfortunately, one of four eagles brought into the rescue center that same week as the one we helped rescue has died from advanced effects like internal bleeding and organ failure caused by severe lead poisoning.

For the three remaining, it’s around-the-clock injections and feeding liquid food. Vitamin K is administered to slow down internal bleeding if possible.

If the three survivors are lucky, they will join other recovering eagles in the fly zone in a few months. A release back into the wild is at least a year away.


Please consider making a donation to help pay for THIS raptor’s care.

You can donate online at  http://www.theraptorcenter.org or call the raptor center at 612-624-8457 

The Raptor Center is located at 1920 Fitch Ave, St. Paul, MN 55108 and the phone number is 612-624-4745

Rehabilitation Costs for each Eagle:

$60   One month: food for one eagle

$80   Radiograph for newly admitted raptor

$100 Initial admission exam

$500 Medical care and food for 2 weeks  

Stranded Bald Eagle Rescued

Earlier this morning Kate called to ask if I wanted to go on a little adventure to help rescue a bald eagle that had been stranded in a field for a couple of days.

We stalked through the ankle-deep snow to investigate and take some pics for the raptor center in Minneapolis to evaluate the situation. Upon receiving the pucs and learning that we wete able to get within 6 feet of the bird without it flying iff, they immediately sent a volunteer to meet us and pick up the large bird.

We were prepared for a bit of a chase, but the volunteer calmly and slowly approached the eagle and in just minutes the volunteer had the magnificent creature in his arms, massive feet and huge talons secured and wings tucked safely under the body.

Despite obvious signs of weakness and fatigue, the eagle was a beautiful sight to behold. Hopefully, with being in a safe warm place to rest and getting some much needed food and water, it will make a full recovery.

Lets keep our fingers crossed!

Thanks ro Sara Grace for the photos.